Fun with Road Kill

YEAH ROAD KILL!

The first image in this collection started with the image of the  stuffed raccoon. I thought “that’s kind of morbid, a toy monument to a little dead animal.” I delving  deeper I was amazed at the amount of toys centered around the subject of road kill.  The image collection begins to move from toy road kill to actual road kill, but each images depicts the fun side of animals hit by trucks and cars.

ciao,

faheem

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2 responses to “Fun with Road Kill

  1. The stuffed roadkill toys (derivative of teddy bears, perhaps) subvert the notion of furry fun toy.

    The transition from stuffed roadkill “toys” to conceptual and photographic roadkill humor is a bit abrupt. However, the GI Joe #17 is a good bridge.

    The Easter bunny #15 is brilliant and really disturbing with a level of depth beyond the other images, save the Striped #14, which is oddly poignant in a different way in that it looks not staged to me, but actual documentary evidence. To me that reading has a sad context that, though “accidentally” humorous, is out of place with some of the other photos.

  2. I agree with Andrew’s choices and some of the other images you’ve chosen. The morbid hipster adult toys and fake motivational posters detract a bit from the greater curiosity, pleasure or morbid intrigue that I get from less easily categorized images which one can call “roadkill” but that have some other narratives going on as well.

    The Easter Bunny image (#17) and the toy soldiers (#6) both add a fake or toy element to a real death, which gives them an uncomfortable tension, that I think often happens when real and fake violence collide in the same space.

    I’m really taken with images 13 and 14 of what appears to be possibly a stuffed animal that was wearing an outfit, that has been run over by a couple thousand cars or so. This, to me, trumps all of the fake roadkill toys and is a much more abstract object. It looks like it was found rather than staged and the history of wear and car carnage imbues the object with something stronger than the clever new toys. It has a history and has been mutated by impact into something else that is more complex than the usual recognizable form with tire tracks on top of it.

    Image #4 (the striped dead animal) is one I have seen before – it seems like a perfect metaphor for something (bad luck?). Really an iconic image.

    Image #5 (the dead owl mask wearing human) also expands the category a bit and makes for an interesting addition.

    The collection doesn’t entirely cohere as an experience but there are some interesting choices and directions.

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