33 Images of Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods – Trowbridge

Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods
Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods

Collection: 33 Images of Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods

Adam Trowbridge

The above images are the edited result of multiple Google Image Searches for various urban/suburban wildlife, squirrels, ducks, geese, chipmunks, pigeons, seagulls, etc., eating orange food snacks, in most cases puffed or unpuffed “Cheetos” or what many would consider “generic Cheetos”. The collection resulted from a discussion some months ago between my wife, Jessica Westbrook, our son and I in which we considered the feasibility of developing a seagulls vs. pigeons game in which the two parties would compete, in a K-Mart parting lot, for “orange snack foods”. The phrase was coined by Ms. Westbrook to describe the myriad orange snack foods we had collectively seen various animals eating in our previous year in Chicago. This concept was stolen with her permission via Skype.

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4 responses to “33 Images of Urban/Suburban Wildlife Eating Orange Snack Foods – Trowbridge

  1. Pretty cool-looking and very specific. Orange snacks are typically classified (in snack taxonomies) as cheesy snacks, which are often crunchy snacks. Sometimes they also qualify as salty snacks.

  2. You know, as opposed to orange-flavored snacks.

  3. Which are citrus-y and often sweet.

    What I like about the subject matter is the suggested contrast between nature and culture. There is definitely a color mood going on there between the orange culture and the cooler natural colors. I think I would like to see some punctuation or sad poignancy of, for example, a bird with its head stuck in a Cheetos bag.

  4. This is an extremely amusing collection that delights me every time I scroll through it. It maybe shouldn’t be so funny (there’s definitely something tragic about animals living off of our cast off junk food), but it’s really hard to contend with a bug-eyed squirrel gnawing on a Cheese Puff ™ (or is it a Cheese Doodle™ or a Cheese Curl™, or should I be spelling these as “Cheez” or “Cheeze” or some other bastardization?). Do these animals even see in color? Or do they just love the texture of puffed corn and the flavor of powdered cheese?

    My hunch is that most of these animals – particularly in urban situations – have grown interested in the taste of just about anything they can find on the ground (or on my plate at an outdoor food stand, as evidenced on my recent trip to Finland where a mangy bird went right for my apple pastry when I stepped away to get a napkin just 10 feet away).

    I have no great criticisms. This collection takes something unusual that one might have thought to be a bizarre anomaly if you saw just one animal eating this crap, and builds a convincing visual argument through a large accumulation of evidence. The range of animals helps to make the collection more compelling. If it was solely one type of animal, I don’t think 33 images would be necessary but the broader selection and variety of close ups, distance shots and crowd shots makes for a pretty dynamic collection that also isn’t any larger than it needs to be.

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